Reliable needle visualization during ultrasound guided regional and vascular procedures. A simple solution to steep angle echogenicity loss with any ultrasound system, based on target depth.

  • Jonathan Kline, CRNA, MSNA Twin Oaks Anesthesia

Abstract

Ultrasound guided regional anesthesia has become recognized as the evolving alternative to standard landmark based techniques for nerve blockade and vascular access. It’s limitations begin to be recognized as needle angles are increased beyond 30 degrees as in those commonly used for deep injections. This element regarding it’s use remains difficult to overcome especially for novice users.  Loss of needle visibility on the monitor screen, remains a source of irritation for many providers, leaving them confused as to the value of ultrasound’s true utility. This article will explore a simple, reliable strategy for improved needle visibility on any ultrasound machine, using the mathematical property of the law of Sines. The only numerical value needed from the user is the depth to determine this technique.

Author Biography

Jonathan Kline, CRNA, MSNA, Twin Oaks Anesthesia
Director of Education

References

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Published
2015-11-28
How to Cite
KLINE, CRNA, MSNA, Jonathan. Reliable needle visualization during ultrasound guided regional and vascular procedures. A simple solution to steep angle echogenicity loss with any ultrasound system, based on target depth.. Anesthesia eJournal, [S.l.], v. 3, n. 2, nov. 2015. ISSN 2333-2611. Available at: <https://anesthesiaejournal.com/index.php/aej/article/view/39>. Date accessed: 24 feb. 2020.
Section
Articles

Keywords

needle visualization; needle enhancement; increased needle visualization under ultrasound