Procedural Ultrasound Location of Pectoral Nerve Neuroma Prior to Breast Reconstruction Surgery

  • Jonathan P Kline, MSNA, CRNA Twin Oaks Anesthesia

Abstract

Chronic pain from breast surgery seems to be relatively commensurate with the increase in number of breast surgeries itself. There have been many improvements in surgery as well as anesthesia technique. These novel techniques have shown promising results in both decreasing post operative pain, opioid use along with the cascade of undesirable side effects, and even cancer recurrence. Ultrasound seems to play an integral part in the development of these analgesic techniques and furthers our understanding of relevant anatomy. We present a case where ultrasound correctly identified a chronic pain causing neuroma during the pre-procedural analgesic employment. The offending neuroma was subsequently reported to the surgeon pre procedurally, and resected under direct vision during the surgical reconstruction. This finding altered the course of the surgery and yielded positive results post operatively.

Author Biography

Jonathan P Kline, MSNA, CRNA, Twin Oaks Anesthesia

Degrees Held: B.S.N. from Southern Adventist University in 2000, M.S.N.A. from University of Alabama Birmingham in 2003 Current Position: Co- Founder and Director of Education of Twin Oaks Anesthesia Affiliations: Twin Oaks Anesthesia Interest: Administering and teaching peripheral nerve blocks and ultrasound guidance Mr. Kline obtained his B.S.N. from Southern Adventist University in 2000 and his M.S.N.A. from the University of Alabama Birmingham in 2003. His the Co-Founder and Director of Education of Twin Oaks Anesthesia. He is passionate about teaching others peripheral nerve blocks and ultrasound guidance. Mr. Kline has been an active lecturer regarding regional anesthesia and ultrasound techniques since 2006

Published
2018-10-07
How to Cite
KLINE, MSNA, CRNA, Jonathan P. Procedural Ultrasound Location of Pectoral Nerve Neuroma Prior to Breast Reconstruction Surgery. Anesthesia eJournal, [S.l.], v. 6, p. 22-25, oct. 2018. ISSN 2333-2611. Available at: <http://anesthesiaejournal.com/index.php/aej/article/view/94>. Date accessed: 12 dec. 2018.
Section
Articles